Illusion vs Reality

“Illusion, a derivative of reality, and vice versa.” – GS

For a little backstory… one day, a follower threw me a curveball: ‘What separates illusion from reality?’ I countered with a snap response: ‘What separates acceleration from speed?’

Perception in Motion: Illusion, Confusion, and Zen Insight

Many perceive the two 3D cross-like shapes as moving significantly, though they remain stationary!

The interplay of color shades (light/dark) on the edges and body of the cross-like wire frames creates the illusion of motion. The alternating shadings simulate “motion blur,” leading some researchers to attribute these illusory movements to delays in luminance processing, producing a signal that deceives the motion system and induces “kinetopsia” (motion perception)..

This brings to mind an anecdote: Two Zen monks debated a flag moved by the wind. One claimed, ‘The flag is moving…’ while the other countered, ‘The wind is moving!’ The monastery’s prior intervened, stating, ‘Not the wind, not the flag; the mind is moving…’

This short anecdote serves to explain that the concept and perception of motion is sometimes ambiguous.

Autokinetic Illusion

Immerse yourself in the mesmerizing experience as blue droplets seemingly sway gracefully, creating an illusion of gentle motion. The yellow horizontal lines contribute to a wave-like dance, enhancing the visual allure.

Hold On Tight” by Gianni A. Sarcone, crafted in 1997.

This op art piece embodies a peripheral drift illusion (PDI), wherein a sawtooth luminance grating in the visual periphery induces the illusion of movement.

Fascinatingly, studies by vision researchers reveal that the illusory motion activates brain regions akin to those triggered by actual movement.

Noteworthy accolades include a feature on Google Science Fair (@googlescifair):

Explore and acquire “Hold On Tight” as prints and posters through our online gallery.

Wandering Eye

The entire sea urchin functions as a massive compound eye because each of its spines conceals tube feet with light-sensitive cells at their bases. Essentially, a sea urchin is one large, moving, spine-covered eye. While its vision might not astonish an eye doctor, for an animal devoid of actual eyes, it’s rather impressive!

A representation of the computational model of the ‘spherical’ vision of the sea urchin.

For further details, you can read more here.